Readings in Public History Theory and Methods (Spring 2016)

Approach and Goals

During the semester we will investigate both the history of the public history movement and the theories and methods that public historians have brought to their work. Public history constitutes a distinct field of study and we will approach it as such, but at the same time, we will keep in mind all the ways that race, socio-economic class, gender, region, family, and politics work to shape the production and discourse around history. Given these goals, I suggest that we begin our conversations with attention to the following questions:

Context

  • How do the key actors in these texts (historians, people of the past, and publics/participants/audiences) go about the work of representing their subject and its significance to themselves and others? How do they see their world and their place in it?
  • How are power and authority negotiated in these contexts?
  • Do the historical actors more or less align themselves with a version of social roles that is based on claims of equality or difference? How does this impact their experience?

Method

  • What is the methodological approach of the author? What are his/her assumptions about the work of doing history?
  • What is the scope of the research? What materials/elements have been excluded?
  • What is the significance of the work in the larger field of public history?
  • How does this work change our understanding of both the practice of public history and the larger work of historians more generally?
  • How does is this work in conversation with other texts in the field?

Written Work

Please write a substantive blog post for each meeting that addresses the questions listed above.

Schedule

January 19, 2016

  • Kelley, Robert. “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects.” The Public Historian 1, no. 1 (October 1, 1978): 16–28. doi:10.2307/3377666.
  • Grele, Ronald J. “Whose Public? Whose History? What Is the Goal of a Public Historian?” The Public Historian 3, no. 1 (Winter 1981): 40–48.
  • Green, Howard. “A Critique of the Professional Public History Movement.” Radical History Review 1981, no. 25 (January 1, 1981): 164–71. doi:10.1215/01636545-1981-25-164.
  • Cole, Charles C., Jr. “Public History: What Difference Has It Made?” The Public Historian 16, no. 4 (October 1, 1994): 9–35. doi:10.2307/3378008.
  • Conard, Rebecca. “Public History As Reflective Practice: An Introduction.” The Public Historian 28, no. 1 (February 1, 2006): 9–13. doi:10.1525/tph.2006.28.issue-1.
  • Corbett, Katharine T., and Howard S. (Dick) Miller. “A Shared Inquiry into Shared Inquiry.” The Public Historian 28, no. 1 (February 1, 2006): 15–38. doi:10.1525/tph.2006.28.issue-1.
  • Howe, Barbara J. “Reflections on an Idea: NCPH’s First Decade.” The Public Historian 11, no. 3 (Summer 1989): 69-85.
  • Karamanski, Ted, and Rebecca Conard. “Reflections on the Founding of NCPH | Public History Commons.” Public History Commons, February 13, 2015. http://publichistorycommons.org/reflections-on-the-founding-of-ncph/.

January 26, 2016

  • Museums, Monuments, and National Parks: Toward a New Genealogy of Public History – Meringolo, Denise D. (2012)

February 2, 2016

  • Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History – Trouillot, Michel-Rolph (1997)

February 9, 2016

No Meeting

February 16, 2016

  • Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory – Blight, David W. (2002)
  • Horton, James E. and Lois Horton, Slavery and Public History: The Tough Stuff of American Memory. New York: New Press, 2006.

February 23, 2016

No Meeting

March 1, 2016

  • Sacred Ground: Americans and Their Battlefields – Linenthal, Edward (1993)
  • Kelman, Ari. A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek. 1.12.2013 edition. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2013.

March 10, 2016

  • Remaking America: Public Memory, Commemoration, and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century – Bodnar, John (1992)
  • Monument Wars: Washington, DC, the National Mall, and the Transformation of Memorial Landscape – Savage, Kirk (2009)

March 29, 2016

  • The Unfinished Bombing: Oklahoma City in American Memory – Linenthal, Edward T. (2003)
  • Tourists of History: Memory, Kitsch, and Consumerism from Oklahoma City to Ground Zero – Sturken, Marita (2007)

April 5, 2016

  • The New History in an Old Museum: Creating the Past at Colonial Williamsburg – Handler, Richard and Gable, Eric (1997)

April 12, 2016

  • History Is Bunk: Assembling the Past at Henry Ford’s Greenfield Village – Swigger, Jessie (2014)

April 19, 2016

  • From Storefront to Monument: Tracing the Public History of the Black Museum Movement – Burns, Andrea (2013)
  • The Lowell Experiment: Public History in a Postindustrial City – Stanton, Cathy (2006)

April 26, 2016

  • The Wages of History: Emotional Labor on Public History’s Front Lines – Tyson, Amy M. (2013)

Readings in 20th Century American Religion (Spring 2016)

Approach and Goals

During the semester we will investigate the ways that historians have attempted to account for experience with and influence of religion in 20th century America. Needless to say, this will lead us to consider socio-economic status, gender, culture, belief, and politics. Given these goals, I suggest that we concentrate on answering a set of questions about the history and a set of questions about the methodology and historiography.

History

  • How do the historical actors in these texts go about the work of representing their religion and its significance to themselves and others? How do they see their world and their place in it?
  • How are power and authority negotiated in this context? What difference does religion make?
  • Do the historical actors more or less align themselves with a version of social roles that is based on claims of equality or difference? How does this impact their experience?

Method and Historiography

  • What is the methodological approach of the author? What are his/her assumptions about religion?
  • What is the scope of the research? What materials/elements have been excluded?
  • What is the significance of the work in the larger field of American religious history?
  • How does this work change our understanding of both religious history and the larger field of 20th century American history?
  • How does is this work in conversation with other texts in the field?

Written Work
Please write a substantive blog post for each meeting that addresses the questions listed above.

Schedule:

Week 1 (January 25, 2016)

  • Butler, Jon. “Jack-in-the-Box Faith: The Religion Problem in Modern American History.” The Journal of American History 90, no. 4 (March 1, 2004): 1357–78. doi:10.2307/3660356.
  • Hollinger, David A. “The ‘Secularization’ Question and the United States in the Twentieth Century.” Church History 70, no. 1 (March 2001): 132–43.
  • Tweed, Thomas A. Crossing and Dwelling a Theory of Religion. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006.

Week 2 (February 1, 2016)

  • Goldman, Karla. Beyond the Synagogue Gallery: Finding a Place for Women in American Judaism. Harvard University Press, 2001.

Week 3 (February 8, 2016)

  • Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks. Righteous Discontent: The Women’s Movement in the Black Baptist Church, 1880-1920. Harvard University Press, 1994.
  • Weisenfeld, Judith. African American Women and Christian Activism: New York’s Black YWCA, 1905-1945. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997.

Week 4 (flex week) (February 15, 2016)

Week 5 (February 22, 2016)

  • Sutton, Matthew Avery. American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press, 2014.

Week 6 (February 29, 2016)

  • McMullen, Josh. Under the Big Top: Big Tent Revivalism and American Culture, 1885-1925. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.

Week 7  (Spring Break) (March 7, 2016)

Week 8 (March 14, 2016)

  • Wacker, Grant. Heaven Below: Early Pentecostals and American Culture. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003.
  • Theusen, Peter. In Discordance with the Scriptures: American Protestant Battles over Translating the Bible. Oxford UP, 2002.

Week 9 (March 21, 2016)

  • Mcgreevy, John T. Parish Boundaries: The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth- Century Urban North. [S.l.]: Univ Of Chicago, 1998.
  • Orsi, Robert A. The Madonna of 115th Street: Faith and Community in Italian Harlem, 1880-1950, Third Edition. 3 edition. New Haven, Conn. ; London: Yale University Press, 2010.
  • Orsi, Robert. “The Religious Boundaries of an Inbetween People: Street Feste and the Problem of the Dark-Skinned Other in Italian Harlem, 1920-1990.” American Quarterly 44, no. 3 (September 1, 1992): 313–47. doi:10.2307/2712980.

Week 10 (flex week) (March 28, 2016)

Week 11 (April 4, 2016)

  • Prell, Riv-Ellen. Fighting to Become Americans: Assimilation and the Trouble between Jewish Women and Jewish Men. 1 edition. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2000.
  • Moore, Deborah Dash. GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard U. Pr., 2004.
  • Prell, Riv-Ellen. “America, Mordecai Kaplan, and the Postwar Jewish Youth Revolt.” Jewish Social Studies 12, no. 2 (January 1, 2006): 158–71. doi:10.2307/4467741.

Week 12 (April 11, 2016)

  • Chappell, David L. A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion and the Death of Jim Crow. Chapel Hill: U. of North Carolina Pr., 2004.
  • Fones-Wolf, Ken, and Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf. Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie. 1st Edition edition. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015.

Week 13 (April 18, 2016)

  • Hinojosa, Felipe. Latino Mennonites: Civil Rights, Faith, and Evangelical Culture, 2014.

Week 14 (April 25, 2016)

  • Kruse, Kevin M. One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America. New York: Basic Books, 2015.
  • Bowler, Kate. Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Readings in 20th Century American Religion (Summer 2015)

Approach and Goals

During the semester we will investigate the ways that historians have attempted to account for experience with and influence of religion in 20th century America. Needless to say, this will lead us to consider socio-economic status, gender, culture, belief, and politics. Given these goals, I suggest that we concentrate on answering a set of questions about the history and a set of questions about the methodology and historiography.

History

  • How do the historical actors in these texts go about the work of representing their religion and its significance to themselves and others? How do they see their world and their place in it?
  • How are power and authority negotiated in this context? What difference does religion make?
  • Do the historical actors more or less align themselves with a version of social roles that is based on claims of equality or difference? How does this impact their experience?

Method and Historiography

  • What is the methodological approach of the author? What are his/her assumptions about religion?
  • What is the scope of the research? What materials/elements have been excluded?
  • What is the significance of the work in the larger field of American religious history?
  • How does this work change our understanding of both religious history and the larger field of 20th century American history?
  • How does is this work in conversation with other texts in the field?

Schedule:

Week 1 (June 10): Class and Economics

  • Kruse, Kevin M. One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America. New York: Basic Books, 2015.
  • Moreton, Bethany. To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise. 8.8.2010 edition. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010.

Week 2 (June 16): Mainline and Liberal Protestantism

  • Coffman, Elesha J. The Christian Century and the Rise of the Protestant Mainline. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.
  •  Hedstrom, Matthew. The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.
  •  Ruble, Sarah E. The Gospel of Freedom and Power: Protestant Missionaries in American Culture After World War II. Univ of North Carolina Pr, 2012.

Week 3 (June 23): Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism

  • Sutton, Matthew Avery. American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press, 2014.
  • Worthen, Molly. Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism. New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Week 4 (June 30): Religious Geographies

  • Orsi, Robert. The Madonna of 115th Street: Faith and Community in Italian Harlem, 1880-1950, Third Edition. 3 edition. New Haven, Conn. ; London: Yale University Press, 2010.
  • Winston, Diane. Red-Hot and Righteous: The Urban Religion of The Salvation Army. New edition edition. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Week 5 (July 7): Judaism

  • Ariel, Yaakov. Evangelizing the Chosen People: Missions to Jews in America, 1880-2000. Chapel Hill: U. of North Carolina Pr., 2000.
  •  Prell, Riv-Ellen. Fighting to Become Americans: Assimilation and the Trouble between Jewish Women and Jewish Men. 1 edition. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2000.

Week 6 (July 28): Catholicism

  • Cummings, Kathleen Sprows. New Women of the Old Faith: Gender and American Catholicism in the Progressive Era. The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.
  • Kane, Paula M. Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

Week 7 (August 10): Culture and Lived Religion

  • Bivins, Jason C. Spirits Rejoice!: Jazz and American Religion. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.
  • Wacker, Grant. Heaven Below: Early Pentecostals and American Culture. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003

Week 8 (August 18): Segregation, Civil Rights and African American Religion

  • Chappell, David L. A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion and the Death of Jim Crow. Chapel Hill: U. of North Carolina Pr., 2004.
  • Fones-Wolf, Ken, and Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf. Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie. 1st Edition edition. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015.
  • Shattuck, Gardiner H. Episcopalians and Race: Civil War to Civil Rights. University Press of Kentucky, 2000.

Week 9 (August 25): West/Borderlands and Imperialism

  • Leon, Luis D. La Llorona’s Children: Religion, Life, and Death in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands. Berkeley: U. of California Pr., 2004.
  • McCullough, Matthew. The Cross of War: Christian Nationalism and U.S. Expansion in the Spanish-American War. 1 edition. Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2014.

Digital Public History (Spring 2013)

Reading | Writing | Building

  1. For each meeting, please read and explore the materials for the week. Then, blog a reflection on those materials.
  2. Final Project: Fashion a response to the question “What difference does digital work make for Public History?” Due May 13.

People/Blogs:

You would do well to follow the feeds from these folks:

Schedule

Week 1 (January 28): History, the Public, Openness, and Ethics

Week 2 (February 11): Participatory Public History

Week 3 (February 25): Digital Strategy

[March 11: Spring Break]

Week 4 (March 25): Digital Exhibits

Week 5 (April 8): Archives

Week 6 (April 22): Mobile

Week 7 (May 6): Evaluation

Women’s Religious History: 19th Century American (Fall 2012)

Approach and Goals

During the semester we will investigate the ways that historians have attempted to account for women’s experience with and influence on religion in 19th century America. Needless to say, this will lead us to consider gender, culture, belief, and politics. Given these goals, I suggest that we concentrate on answering a set of questions about the history and a set of questions about the methodology and historiography.

History

  • How do the historical actors in these texts go about the work of representing their religion and its significance to themselves and others? How do they see their world and their place in it?
  • How are power and authority negotiated in this context? What difference does religion make?
  • Do the historical actors more or less align themselves with a version of gender roles that is based on claims of equality or difference? How does this impact their experience?

Method and Historiography

  • What is the methodological approach of the author? What are his/her assumptions about religion?
  • What is the scope of the research? What materials/elements have been excluded?
  • What is the significance of the work in the larger field of American religious history?
  • How does this work change our understanding of both religious history and the larger field of 19th century American history?
  • How does is this work in conversation with other texts in the field?

Reading Clusters

  1. Quakers and Antebellum Reform (September 6)
    • Holton, Sandra Stanley. Quaker Women: Personal Life, Memory and Radicalism in the Lives of Women Friends, 1780-1930. New Ed. Routledge, 2007.
    • Speicher, Anna M. The Religious World of Antislavery Women: Spirituality in the Lives of Five Abolitionist Lecturers. Syracuse Univ Pr (Sd), 2000.
    • Hardesty, Nancy A. Women Called To Witness: Evangelical Feminism. 1st ed. Univ Tennessee Press, 1999.
    • * Abzug, Robert H. Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination. Oxford University Press, USA, 1994.
  2. Gender and Women’s History, Anthropology and Social Theory (September 20)
    • Scott, Joan Wallach. “Gender: a Useful Category of Historical Analysis.” American Historical Review 91:5 (Winter, 1986): 1053-1075.
    • Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll. Disorderly Conduct: Visions of Gender in Victorian America. Oxford UP, 1985. [“The Female World of Love and Ritual” and “The Cross and the Pedestal”]
    • Kerber, Linda K. “Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Woman’s Place: The Rhetoric of Women’s History” (1988) and “The Republican Mother: Women and the Enlightenment–An American Perspective,” in Towards an Intellectual History of Women: Essays. University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
    • Higginbotham, Evelyn Brook. “African-American Women and the Metalanguage of Race.” Signs (Winter 1992): 251-274.
    • Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. 1st ed. Routledge, 2006. [Prefaces and “Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire” and “Conclusion”]
    • Weber, Max. From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. Routledge, 1991. [“Religious Rejections of the World and their Directions,” (“Politics as a Vocation,” “Science as Vocation,”)]
    • Durkheim, Emile. The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Translated by Karen Fields. Free Press, 1995. [Introduction; Book One: Chapter One and Chapter Four; Book Two: Chapter Three, Chapter Six and Chapter Seven; Book Three: Chapter One and Chapter Five; Conclusion.]
    • Turner, Victor. “The Liminal Period.” Bewtixt and Between: The Liminal Period in Rites de Passage. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1967.
    • * Douglas, Mary. Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concepts of Pollution and Taboo. 1st ed. TAYLOR, 2002.
  3. Native Americans and the Frontier West (October 4)
    • Gutierrez, Ramon A. When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846. First ed. Stanford University Press, 1991.
    • Mihesuah, Devon A. Cultivating the Rosebuds: The Education of Women at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1851-1909. University of Illinois Press, 1997.
    • Deutsch, Sarah. No Separate Refuge: Culture, Class, and Gender on an Anglo-Hispanic Frontier in the American Southwest, 1880-1940. 1ST ed. Oxford University Press, USA, 1987.
    • Pascoe, Peggy. Relations of Rescue: The Search for Female Moral Authority in the American West, 1874-1939. Oxford University Press, USA, 1993.
  4. Mormons and Utopian Communities (October 18)
    • Givens, Terry L. People of Paradox: A History of Mormon Culture. Oxford University Press, 2007.
    • Foster, Lawrence. Women, Family, and Utopia: Communal Experiments of the Shakers, the Oneida Community, and the Mormons. 1st ed. Syracuse Univ Pr (Sd), 1992.
  5. African American Women and Pentacostal and Holiness Churches (November 1)
    • Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks. Righteous Discontent: The Women’s Movement in the Black Baptist Church, 1880-1920. Harvard University Press, 1994.
    • Moody, Joycelyn. Sentimental Confessions: Spiritual Narratives of Nineteenth-Century African American Women. University of Georgia Press, 2003.
    • Grammer, Elizabeth Elkin. Some Wild Visions: Autobiographies by Female Itinerant Evangelists in Nineteenth-Century America. Oxford University Press, USA, 2002.
    • Blumhofer, Edith L. Restoring the Faith: The Assemblies of God, Pentacostalism, and American Culture. University of Illinois Press, 1993.
    • Stephens, Michael S. Who Healeth All Thy Diseases: Health, Healing, and Holiness in the Church of God Reformation Movement. Scarecrow Press, 2008.
  6. Catholicism and Judaism (November 20 — Tuesday)
    • Fitzgerald, Maureen. Habits of Compassion: Irish Catholic Nuns and the Origins of New York’s Welfare System, 1830-1920. University of Illinois Press, 2006.
    • Goldman, Karla. Beyond the Synagogue Gallery: Finding a Place for Women in American Judaism. Harvard University Press, 2001.
    • Cummings, Kathleen Sprows. New Women of the Old Faith: Gender and American Catholicism in the Progressive Era. The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.
    • * Coburn, Carol and Smith, Martha. Spirited Lives: How Nuns Shaped Catholic Culture and American Life, 1836-1920. The University of North Carolina Press, 1999.
  7. Late 19thc Reform Movements (December 6)
    • Hunter, Jane. The Gospel of Gentility: American Women Missionaries in Turn-of-the-Century China. Yale University Press, 1989.
    • Edwards, Wendy J. Deichmann, and Carolyn De Swarte Gifford. Gender and the Social Gospel. University of Illinois Press, 2003.

Outcomes

During the course of the semester, there will be two major outcomes: Reading Responses and Critical Review Essays. The reading responses should consist of a separate short blog post for each reading. The critical reviews should attempt to deal with the larger questions of the course through a discussion of the readings up to the due date:

  • Essay 1: October 8
  • Essay 2: November 9
  • Essay 3: December 10