Schedule

Week 1: Introduction (August 29)

This week we’ll meet each other and go over the syllabus, which is subject to change through the semester based on our progress and interests. Also, we’ll discuss setting up your course response venues, the use of social media, and some important spots for entering the conversation about digital history.

Readings:
  • Start Julie C. Meloni and Michael Morrison, Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours (SAMS, 2009).
Sites:
Tools:

Week 2: Labor Day, No Class (September 5)


Week 3: What is Digital History? (September 12)

Readings:
Sites:
Tools:
Practicum: History Web Critique

Week 4: Site Planning and Design (September 19)

Readings:
Sites:
Tools:
Late Additions:

Week 5: Public History (September 26)

Readings:
Sites:

Week 6: Digital Collections and Digital Preservation (October 3)

Discussion Leaders:

Readings:
Sites:

Week 7: Project Presentation 1 (October 11 — Tuesday)

Readings:

Week 8: What Difference does New Media Make? (October 17)

Discussion Leaders: David and John

Readings:
      • Lev Manovich, The Language of New Media (MIT Press, 2001).

Week 9: Digital Scholarship (October 24)

Discussion Leaders: Geoffrey and Sheri

Readings:
Sites:

Week 10: Data Mining/Distant Reading (October 31)

Discussion Leaders: Megan and Jeri

Readings:
Sites:
Tools:

Week 11: Spatial History and Visualization (November 7)

Discussion Leaders: Richard and Andi

Readings:
Sites:
Tools:

Week 12: Citizen History (November 14)

Discussion Leaders: Scott, Claire, and Chris

Readings:
Sites:

Week 13: Scholarly Communication and Open Access/Open Source (November 21)

Discussion Leaders:

Readings:
Sites:

Week 14: Project Presentations 2 (November 28)


Week 15: What Difference Does New Media Make to Doing History?: Wrap-up and Semester Reflections(December 5)


Projects Due (December 16)

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